Verio Decides what parts of the internet to drop

I think the more pertinent question is whether ARIN might give out parts of former class B space in blocks smaller than /16. If so, then the routing policies are unreasonable. I tend to think that rigidly following the classful structure is unwise, since one can expect over time that CIDR will result in many Class C & B networks becoming superneted, while A's and B's will most likely be subnetted. The supernetting C's and B's benefits the size of the route table, while subnetting A's and B's allows better space utilization. To assume or make policy that there won't be subneting of A's and B's seems to be counterproductive. Thats where much of the better address space utilization was supposed to come from.

It would be nonsensical for ARIN to make allocations based on arbitrary ISP's routing policies. Rather, ISP's should make routing policies based on allocation policies. ISP's can join ARIN to have some input on its policies. Seems we just got our invoice last week...

    --Dean

Around 02:17 AM 12/4/1999 -0500, rumor has it that jlewis@lewis.org said: