using ARIN assigned address in Asia

Hi, I have a question which was originally I was asked by my client.

Our client has IP address space that was originally assigned from ARIN.
Their address space is a big enough to separate to /20 each.
I am not sure about internaltionl IP address assignment.

They would like to use front half (/20) in North America.
And, they would like to use the other half of the address space (/20) in
Asia.

Is there any problems doing this?

thanks,

Kenji

As the IP addresses were obtained in some form from ARIN, I would suggest
that your customer reads through the ARIN documentation associated with
the assignment, and/or formally contacts ARIN.

Hello Kenji,

There is not a policy that states IP address space allocated by ARIN has to
be
utilized exclusively in the ARIN region.

ARIN is not in a position to place limitations on how this IP address space
is
routed, but does encourage aggregation.

If you would like to be certain there are no conflicts with the proposed use
of
this IP address space and the conditions under which it was allocated to
this
organization, I suggest you have them contact ARIN by either sending email
to hostmaster@arin.net or calling the registration services help desk.

Contact information for ARIN can be found at www.arin.net

Richard Jimmerson
Director of Operations
American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN)

To All,

Thank you very much for all your answers!!
I think that I know what to answer to my client.

Thank you very much!!

Kenji

Hello,

Kenji Anzai wrote:

Our client has IP address space that was originally assigned from ARIN.
Their address space is a big enough to separate to /20 each.
[..]
They would like to use front half (/20) in North America.
And, they would like to use the other half of the address space (/20) in
Asia.

By using i.e. announcing ip-ranges < /19 you risk beeing filtered by one
of the major ISPs.

I wouldnt recommend splitting it up in 2 * /20.

regards,

  Arnd

OR ...

  You could always be sure and connect to the same "backbone" provider in
each location. then said provider can aggregate the two /20's to a /19. If
you need/want a second backbone provider in each location. get a connection
between the US and Asia locations. You could even do this as a tunnel using
just the port addresses of each connection. OF course a tunnel may not scale
very well and might not be "a good thing". There are just so many ways to
make sure that /19 is announced to the "filtering" majors ...

-Chris

I am unaware of ANY service provider who filters on /19s anymore, excepting
old Class B space, which is usually filtered on /16s. Because the RIR's
issue /20s, everyone accepts them. Your milage may vary, of course.

- Daniel Golding

On Thu, Mar 22, 2001 at 05:06:57AM -0500, Chris Gibiault had this to say:

OR ...

  You could always be sure and connect to the same "backbone" provider in
each location. then said provider can aggregate the two /20's to a /19. If

assuming, of course, that your 'backbone' NSP has connectivity in both N
America and Asia.

I am unaware of ANY service provider who filters on /19s anymore, excepting
old Class B space ...

http://info.us.bb.verio.net/

My mistake. However, the statements:

We accept /20 and shorter in the 24/8, 61/8, 63/8, 64/8, 65/8, and 66/8
address space
In the traditional Class C space (i.e., 192/3), we accept /24 and shorter.

in Verio's routing policy, effectivly means that folks issues /20s by RIR's
will have no problem routing them, which was actually my point. With RIR's
issueing space in 0/1, most providers filter at /20 or /24 boundaries there.
Obviously, a few providers like Verio are more granular.