Top webhosters offering v6 too?

Which of the big boys are doing it?

Tim

Tim Chown writes:

Which of the big boys are doing it?

Google - although there don't call themselves a web hoster, they can be
used for hosting web sites using services such as Sites or App Engine.
Both support IPv6, either using the opt-in mechanism or by using an
alternate CNAME (ghs46 instead of ghs.google.com). That's what I use.

None of the other large "cloud" providers seems to support IPv6 for
their users yet. In particular, neither Amazon's AWS not Microsoft
Azure have much visible activity in this direction. Rackspace have
announced IPv6 support for the first half of 2011.

Concerning the more traditional webhosting offerings, I have no idea
about the "big boys". Here in Switzerland, a few smaller hosters
support IPv6. And I saw IPv6 mentioned in ads for some German server
hosting offering. Germany is interesting because it has a
well-developed hosting ecosystem with some really big players.

I ran across this link a while back, it shows, of the top 100k
websites (according to Alexa), which ones are IPv6 enabled:

http://www.atoomnet.net/ipv6_enabled_popular_websites.php?complete_list=true

I have used both softlayer and arpnetworks. Both have v6 by default, but
only softlayer can be considered a big boy... multiple sites. Cloud and
dedicated servers ... softlayer is a class act with v6 added for free

Many virtual private server companies (I have 2 BurstNET VPS servers
in Scranton and Los Angeles) will give you a /64 of IPv6 addresses.
This is always an option.

And 1.5% of AAAA lookups, in the Alexa top 1000000, fail as the SOA
is in the wrong section or the wrong SOA is returned or timeout or
return NXDOMAIN when A returns a answer. GLB vendors have a lot
to answer for as almost all of these errors involve a GLB being
installed. Either their products are broken or their documentation
is so poor that people can't configure their boxes properly.

Mark

Given that v6 is probably an afterthought for these vendors, I'm
guessing the documentation is at fault. I know the docs for some of the
brands I've worked with were bad enough for tier-1 features. Bah.

I'm in the process of putting together a fully software based system to
do GLB. Presenting on it in a couple of weeks in the Los Angeles area.
Hit me off list for details. It seems fairly straightforward to put the
system together. Spent this weekend doing the research and architecture
design for it.

I'll send the slide link to the list after I give the talk. Maybe I'll
present it in person at one of the upcoming NANOG meetings if I can get
my employer to sponsor travel. :slight_smile:

Unfortunately it will be all v4. I have v6 turned up via he.net (as I
alluded to a while back), but it's not at the same level as v4 is. I'm
currently going through the learning process with v6. However that's an
incredibly high priority for me, and I hope to be at parity with v4 by
end of Q1.

I'll probably do a separate "ipv6 for datacenter/application operators"
presentation at some point in Q2. I know there will be one at SCALE this
year, by one of our frequent v6 posters. :slight_smile:

- --
Charles N Wyble (charles@knownelement.com)
Systems craftsman for the stars
http://www.knownelement.com
Mobile: 626 539 4344
Office: 310 929 8793

We (voxel.net, AS 29791) offer dual-stack on all server and cloud
products. As others have pointed out, SoftLayer is an excellent
example of a hosting provider that Gets It on a large scale.

Sadly, v6 support on popular "cloud-only" services is suspiciously
absent. Terremark vCoudExpress, Savvis, Amazon EC2, among others
don't support it today, or on any public roadmaps...

-a

We (voxel.net, AS 29791) offer dual-stack on all server and cloud
products. As others have pointed out, SoftLayer is an excellent
example of a hosting provider that Gets It on a large scale.

Sadly, v6 support on popular "cloud-only" services is suspiciously
absent. Terremark vCoudExpress, Savvis, Amazon EC2, among others
don't support it today, or on any public roadmaps...

It's worth noting that the address space used in the large public clouds
almost certainly overlaps with one's own private numbering plan, and
having had to interconnect with some "public cloud" I can tell you that
I do not appreciate having to 1:1 nat several thousand potential systems.

I poked several about v6 support it would be greately appreciated if
other people would likewise contact your account reps.

No need friend. The AWS support thread on IPv6 goes back to 2007 ...
and still no support. I'd give up and move on ... just like an ISP
that does not support IPv6 today. It's a fight not worth picking.

Between Voxel and Softlayer, i assume nearly any need can be met ...
and the VPS market is pretty cut throat and customers can move quick.
We cannot talk blue in the face about how people should support IPv6,
that time has passed. Many organizations do support IPv6, they have
had the forethought, and we should really vote with our dollars and
not yet another round of posturing about how important v6 is and how X
company should add IPv6 to their roadmap.

Cloud and mobile are 2 very fast growing edges ... and you cannot do
any level of network planning for these fast growing edges and
overlook IPv6.

Cameron

Here's one list:
http://www.sixxs.net/wiki/IPv6_Enabled_Hosting

Frank

BlueHost, which while maybe not a great quality web host, by all
measures is a big one, not only does not support IPv6 but they denied
my request to create a AAAA record pointing to a friend's IPv6 page
for a domain I host there.

BH, are you listening???

-. Carlos

An excellent example of a provider that Spams on a large scale, too.

There are plenty of providers that support IPv6 and would be happy to
have a new customer that's interested in IPv6. If your current host does
not support it and you want it, just drop them already and move on to
one that does.

~Seth

Oxilion, dutch based provider (AS48539), also provides cloud services based
on RHEV. They do provide IPv6 also.
See for a redhat notice about this:
http://www.redhat.com/about/news/prarchive/2010/oxilion.html
Their site is mostly dutch, however this one is in English also
http://oxilion.nl/virtual-datacenter-en

regards, Igor

Tim Chown <tjc@ecs.soton.ac.uk> writes:

Which of the big boys are doing it?

Strato in Germany. They offer IPv6 for dedicated server now. I was told
that the implementation for their shared hosting (about one million
domains) is almost finished and that they also offer IPv6 for virtual
servers (problems with the vendor).

Jens

Unsure of how big they are in the grand scheme, but I use Dreamhost.
They quietly started offering IPv6 on all accounts about a week ago.

-S.

Hey, maybe all we need is an analysis site which says "warning: your
ipv6 is broken!". And give reasons ... point out misconfiguration
like your examples above, regardless of whether it's dns or global
load balancers. We'll see v6 adoption skyrocket overnight. :wink:

http://test-ipv6.com/ is a good start for basic sanity checks. I need to
get my v6 content provider stuff done and write up a blog post and/or do
a presentation. Soon....

- --
Charles N Wyble (charles@knownelement.com)
Systems craftsman for the stars
http://www.knownelement.com
Mobile: 626 539 4344
Office: 310 929 8793