Tech contact for Qwest?

Absolutely. Unfortunately being a teacher is a completely different
profession which requires completely different talents. A lot of very
good engineers are poor teachers. Having tried to teach professionally
i know that it is much harder than it seems.

--vadim

PS Actually, i do not see shortage of clueful network engineers. What
    i see is complete lack of clueful managers. Engineers are often left
    without any useful managerial support, and all too often are simply
    screwed up by the bad management. That's why i think the fact that
    good engineers are getting more expensive is positive. When management
    if forced to pay through the nose for the professional expertise, they
    more likely feel compelled to follow the offered advice.

    It is quite possible to run a large backbone with two-three top-notch
    engineers - providing they can pick their assistants and don't have
    to spend most of their time dealing with bureaucratic idiocy.

PS Actually, i do not see shortage of clueful network engineers. What
    i see is complete lack of clueful managers. Engineers are often left
    without any useful managerial support, and all too often are simply
    screwed up by the bad management. That's why i think the fact that
    good engineers are getting more expensive is positive. When management
    if forced to pay through the nose for the professional expertise, they
    more likely feel compelled to follow the offered advice.

    It is quite possible to run a large backbone with two-three top-notch
    engineers - providing they can pick their assistants and don't have
    to spend most of their time dealing with bureaucratic idiocy.

What is the definition of "top notch"? If you mean 4th level engineers
and network planners, then yes. If you mean 2nd level engineers, then I
disagree. Backbones are (and should be) too big for 3 people to manage.

PS Actually, i do not see shortage of clueful network engineers. What
    i see is complete lack of clueful managers.

when i look up, there is not a clue in the sky -- a net engineer

Backbones are (and should be) too big for 3 people to manage.

yup. it takes three to engineer it and at least two more to shield them
from upper management and vice versa. :slight_smile:

randy

<yup. it takes three to engineer it and at least two more to shield them
<from upper management and vice versa. :slight_smile:

<randy

Thank you. Going through what we're going through right now, I can
definitely identify with this statement.

Actually, the tendency I've seen in most non-ISP companies is that the
companies shell out an increasing amount of money for progressively less
clue, dump more and more work on a shrinking staff, and continue to ignore
everything they say. Maybe ISPs/Telcos are different.

I don't believe clue is getting sparse; I think that the clueful refuse to
work for non-clued management, and they're getting better at spotting it and
realizing that obscene salaries really aren't worth putting up with all the
BS.

As Randy said, clue attracts clue.

S

Stephen Sprunk, K5SSS, CCIE#3723
Network Consulting Engineer
Cisco NSA Dallas, Texas, USA
e-mail:ssprunk@cisco.com
Pager: +1 800 365-4578
Empowering the Internet Generation

Hello All, Statement #1 below is -SO- true . From -very- recent
  experience . Sorry about the 'me-2' . JimL