SWIP update intervals (was: Re: Getting an AS and /18)

...and while we're on the subject of SWIPs, can I get a pet peeve off my
chest - the fact that RADB entries are updated in minutes, yet it takes
typically 24 hours or more for a SWIP database change to show up in the
servers (and the next day to even determine that the change was accepted
by the servers)? Is there any real reason for ARIN to not be able to
update the database in near-real-time?

The problem is that none of these organizations have any real incentive
to care. They're all "monopolies".

For example, recently NetSol updated whois database at 2AM on 6/28/01
and didn't bother to update again until 6PM on 7/2/01. Approx. 112 hours
later. There are a LOT of things that depend on whois. But, despite
language at icann.org web site that says

  NSI Registry Agreement
  (form approved 4 November 1999)

  9. Publication by NSI of Registry Data.

        (A) NSI shall provide an interactive web page and a
  port 43 Whois service providing free public query-based
  access to up-to-date (i.e. updated at least daily)
  registry database data

NetSol obviously doesn't give a damn about whether or not whois is up to
date. They don't have to. Their lucrative monopoly was recently extended
for many more years.

Unfortunately I don't know of a simple way that databases like these can
be maintained without relying on a monopoly organization doing the
actual work. It's just something you need to learn to live with.

Nothing described similar monopolies better than Lily Tomlin's memorable
character Ernestine the telephone operator:

  We're the phone company.
  We don't care, we don't have to.

NetSol obviously doesn't give a damn about whether or not whois is up to
date. They don't have to. Their lucrative monopoly was recently extended
for many more years.

What's sad is that it would be fairly trivial for them to implement a
real-time whois update. I don't know why they don't just do it.

        We're the phone company.
        We don't care, we don't have to.

Oh yeah. :slight_smile:

-joe

Apparently NSOL thinks they are "special".. Even though my nameservers are
registered with OpenSRS, NSOL thinks that I need to spend time (weeks,
sometimes), sending them an updated "host" form every time I change an IP
address.

Luckily, the root servers reflect the correct nameserver IP addresses, even
though NSOL's whois doesn't. But this still doesn't keep my customers from
asking me why WHOIS doesn't show the correct nameserver information, and
worrying that people won't be able to get to their website or send them mail.

Of course, my answer to them is always "use a different registrar".
Hopefully, eventually, enough people will leave NSOL that they'll start
"caring".

--Adam

Apparently NSOL thinks they are "special".. Even though my nameservers are
registered with OpenSRS, NSOL thinks that I need to spend time (weeks,
sometimes), sending them an updated "host" form every time I change an IP
address.

I have some important name servers at NSOL that I have been trying
to get updated for weeks, I'm down to the 'pay em $299' extortion plan
to get them updated. --Mike--

I know, they're idiots -- the last time I tried to get a host updated, they
took over two weeks, finally I called them and the guy couldn't figure out
why it hadn't updated, so I gave him (over the phone) my crypt-pw, and he
said everything was good, I didn't hear anything back from them for two more
weeks, when I got an e-mail that said that I had sent the e-mail from the
wrong address (even though I had sent the correct password), and that it
couldn't be updated. Thankfully, by then, the NSOL db had updated from the
crsnic db and finally had the correct data.

I just updated another one of my nameservers with OpenSRS last night, the
crsnic whois and gtld servers have already updated, let's see how long it
takes for NSOL to update this time.

--Adam

Move the "owning" domain to opensrs, clickety click and next update you're
done.

The only issue is that network solutions' whois will be wrong, but
you can just explain netsol's cluelessness to anyone that asks.

Why would you pay netsol a penny more than they're worth?

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>
>
> > NetSol obviously doesn't give a damn about whether or not
whois is up to
> > date. They don't have to. Their lucrative monopoly was
recently extended
> > for many more years.
>
> What's sad is that it would be fairly trivial for them to implement a
> real-time whois update. I don't know why they don't just do it.

Apparently NSOL thinks they are "special".. Even though my
nameservers are
registered with OpenSRS, NSOL thinks that I need to spend time (weeks,
sometimes), sending them an updated "host" form every time I change an IP
address.

That's fascinating. They refused my host template altogether because my
nameserver names are under a domain held at Register.com. I had to go
through Register.com to change my NS IP addresses. Crsnic whois shows the
correct IP address, and Register.com as the registrar. Register.com whois
shows the correct IP address (most of the time ;). Only domain records at
whois.networksolutions.com show the wrong IP address always.

Strange thing is, NSOL accepted a host template registering a new host with
a
name under a ccTLD domain, and NEVER sent confirmation to the contact for
that domain (which is myself), like they do for host records with names
under
com/net/org.

There's just no rhyme or reason to how things work over there in Herndon
anymore.

Luckily, the root servers reflect the correct nameserver IP
addresses, even
though NSOL's whois doesn't. But this still doesn't keep my
customers from
asking me why WHOIS doesn't show the correct nameserver information, and
worrying that people won't be able to get to their website or
send them mail.

Of course, my answer to them is always "use a different registrar".
Hopefully, eventually, enough people will leave NSOL that they'll start
"caring".

Yep, I get this all the time, too. It's just one more "mantra" I have
learned to repeat in my sleep.

Here's the gig.

If host records (or glue records for them) are already out there, you can
specify them (exact match on name and IP address) as nameservers for a
domain you manage.

If they DON'T exist, you must be the manager of the domain name the
nameservers are in and they MUST be created prior to being specified as
nameservers for another domain.

To update the IP address of a nameserver record, you must be the manager
of the domain name they are in.