Route Supression Problem

His bandwidth then drops
to 0 for almost exactly 30 minutes (MRTG isn't an exactly graph). My

guess

Still using MRTG? Have you read this?
http://www.mit.edu/~rbeverly/papers/rtg-lisa02.pdf
Or this? RTG FAQ

Have you checked the price of 200 gigabyte hard drives and calculated how
long it would take to fill one if you were saving everything RTG could
collect?

Seriously, how much do you risk losing over one incident like this where
you don't have the data to show your customer exactly what happened and
give them the impression that you are an amazing TCP/IP guru? MRTG is
utterly obsolete; replace it! http://rtg.sourceforge.net

And if you can't make it to every NANOG meeting, then do check the website
for useful presentations like this one
http://www.nanog.org/mtg-0302/ppt/beverly.pdf

--Michael Dillon

P.S. considering the price of huge disk drives, I'd even consider setting
up a system to capture traces of all the traffic whenever a traffic
anomally occurs. That way you have even more useful info for a post mortem
analysis.

Ok, let's call a spade a spade. I've been an "early adopter" of RTG,
and am using it for traffic graphing in a production environment (in
conjunction with a more tested Cricket/RRD setup, for redundancy and
data verification). I think it's a nifty tool, with great potential,
a clueful and responsive maintainer, and a loyal user base continually
developing and contributing cool stuff. However, like any software in
its infancy, RTG is far from perfect.

I find it unfair to label MRTG as "utterly obsolete," nor to speak of
RTG -- or any one tool -- as a drop-in replacement appropriate for all
environments. Sure it doesn't scale particularly well, but there's a
certain appeal to its simplicity and versatility, which I consider a
key to its continued usage in the face of more robust alternatives.

-a