Report: Major Newspaper Sites Hobbled by Power Woes

This leads us to the old fact that several ISPs and hosting providers protect their servers with every network perimeter security resource (firewalls, IPSs, virus-and-spam-appliances etc) but forget that "availability" as a security principle requires adequate physical and utility safeguards also (backup site, automated failover, redundant communication links between sites and backbones, capable UPS, air-conditioning, fire-extinguishing...). Not all, as you see, are computer-related "per se", but they are "sine-qua-non" for 24x7 availability.

Abra´┐Żos,
Marlon Borba, CISSP.

MARLON BORBA wrote:

This leads us to the old fact that several ISPs and hosting providers protect their servers with every network perimeter security resource (firewalls, IPSs, virus-and-spam-appliances etc) but forget that "availability" as a security principle requires adequate physical and utility safeguards

Yes, but Advance Internet isn't an ISP, it's a division of Newhouse Newspapers and exists primarily to service the Newhouse new media outlets. Cleveland.com, for example, is co-owned with the Cleveland _Plain Dealer_.

You'd think the company would be more careful about protecting a major extension to its core business.

Fergie writes:

A power outage at an Advance Internet hosting facility
has hobbled the web sites for the company's chain of
more than 30 newspapers, including many large metropolitan
dailies. The Advance newspapers have switched to text-based
sites to continue publishing, but are currently unable to
display advertising, making the outage a potentially costly event.
http://news.netcraft.com/archives/2005/07/06/major_newspaper_sites_hobbled_by_power_woes.html

Yes, but Advance Internet isn't an ISP, it's a division of Newhouse
Newspapers and exists primarily to service the Newhouse new media outlets.
Cleveland.com, for example, is co-owned with the Cleveland _Plain Dealer_.

You'd think the company would be more careful about protecting a major
extension to its core business.

In Newhouse's defense, they do seem to have a plan to get the news out
even after losing their hosting facility, just not how to make money from it :slight_smile:

If you pick just about any major newspaper group and do reverse lookups
and traceroutes on the IP addresses of their public "news" web sites, you
will likely find the same situation for many newspaper chains -- all their eggs
in one basket. I've seen similar outages for other groups, just never quite
this long-lasting.

Advance may have thought this exposure through, and determined the
risk of hosting all their web sites in a single data center was worth the
cost savings over building and maintaining identical deployments at two
physically diverse hosting facilities, but did CYA and build a DR site
with just enough horsepower to get the news out, but not enough to keep
the revenue coming in, betting that most outages would be short lived.

Not all bets can be winners.

Kevin Kadow