RE: 923 Mbps across the Ocean ...

We have been talking to the radio astronomy people. We are aware they have such needs, however, I am unclear whether they have succeeded in transmitting single stream TCP application to application throughput of 900Mbits/s over 10,000km on a regular basis. Perhaps you could point me to whom to talk to. I am aware of the work of Richard Hughes-Jones of Manchester University and others and the Radio Astronomy VLBI Data Transmission (see for example http://www.hep.man.ac.uk/~rich/VLBI_web/) since we have shared notes and talked together a lot on the high performance issues. My understanding is that for today they use special high performance tapes to ship the data around, and are actively looking at using the network.

e-VLBI could easily live with a 1% packet loss rate, so I see no need for it to use TCP. (Much higher and the correlator hardware
will probably start having trouble staying in sync.)

The 1.8 Gbps igrid2002 demo used UDP, for example.

http://www.hep.man.ac.uk/~rich/VLBI_web/igrid2002_index.html

We have been talking to the radio astronomy people. We are aware they have such needs, however, I am unclear whether they have succeeded in transmitting single stream TCP application to application throughput of 900Mbits/s over 10,000km on a regular basis. Perhaps you could point me to whom to talk to. I am aware of the work of Richard Hughes-Jones of Manchester

Alan Whitney <awhitney@haystack.mit.edu>
Hans Hinteregger <hhinteregger@haystack.mit.edu>
Hisao Uose <uose.hisao@lab.ntt.co.jp>
Craig Walker < cwalker@nrao.edu>

University and others and the Radio Astronomy VLBI Data Transmission (see for example http://www.hep.man.ac.uk/~rich/VLBI_web/) since we have shared notes and talked together a lot on the high performance issues. My understanding is that for today they use special high performance tapes to ship the data around, and are actively looking at using the network.

Today, yes, although the disk drive based Mark 5 system will be rapidly rolled out, as it will substantially reduce operating costs.

http://web.haystack.mit.edu/e-vlbi/whitney.pdf

(BTW, the Mk5 deployment plan

involves buying a metric ton of shippable disk drives.)

Tape shipping for the USNO VLBI correlator is on the order of $ 50K per month (not counting recorder maintenance), so the
real question is, when will it be possible to ship 1 Gbps data by fiber cheaper than than by FedEx. As the data are loss tolerant, and as buffers are cheap, thus the interest in using worse than best effort bandwidth. (If anyone is interested in the
this, I am trying to have an informal bar bof to discuss it at the SF IETF.)

I cannot see how this is really relevant to NANOG and would suggest that it be taken off list.

From: alex@yuriev.com [mailto:alex@yuriev.com]
Sent: Saturday, March 08, 2003 12:23 PM
To: Jason Slagle
Cc: Richard A Steenbergen; fingers; nanog@merit.edu
Subject: Re: 923 Mbps across the Ocean ...

A) The amount of arrogance it takes to declare a land speed "record" when
   there are people out there doing way more than this on a regular
basis.

Single stream at 900mbs over that distance? Where?

Talk to folks that deal with radio telescopes.

Alex

                                  Regards
                                  Marshall Eubanks

T.M. Eubanks
Multicast Technologies, Inc.
Phone : 703-293-9601 Fax : 703-293-9609
e-mail : tme@multicasttech.com
http://www.multicasttech.com

  Our New Multicast Workshop :
  http://www.multicasttech.com/workshop