Network Solutions is now in the wringer

Best to be aware of what is now coming down on Network Solutions.
The following is an excerpt from this article:
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/990325/ny_asensio_1.html

   The following is being issued by Asensio & Company, a member of the
   National Association of Securities Dealers, CRD number 31742:

   Investors may be buying Network Solutions, Inc.'s (Nasdaq: NSOL - news)
   stock believing the company possesses some market advantage, recurring
   income or proprietary technology that has allowed it to create, and
   will allow it to grow, its Internet domain name registry and registrar
   business. We found no reasonable basis for these beliefs. NSOL's
   domain name business has been and remains totally reliant on a
   7-year-old U.S. federal government contract, which is expiring and will
   not be renewed. We believe that NSOL's management has purposely
   disseminated misleading information, and failed to disclose material
   negative information, that has led investors to believe that the
   expiration of this contract will be postponed or that it cannot be
   entirely and easily terminated. Investors have also been led to believe
   that even if the contract is terminated, NSOL's business value will
   continue to grow. These expectations are baseless and false.

If their house of cards collapses too quickly it could have some serious
operational impacts. And we all do realize that it is a house of cards,
don't we?

This is a request for consideration of a technical and operations question. Although it pertains to a political topic, I am only asking for consideration of a matter that is clearly relevant to nanog.

In particular, what are the 'serious operational impacts' that could develop? There is a long-standing claim that services of the type offered by NSI are fine left without special handling (oversight, assistance). To the extent that problems to such a company can have far-reaching impact on Internet operations, it would be extremely helpful to understand them before the fact. This might permit consideration of methods to avoid such fall-out.

d/

If their house of cards collapses too quickly it could have some
serious operational impacts.

yup. so could a metor strike. in other words, gordon cook does not
need competition, please. or, in other words, don't we have real
operational things to worry about?

randy

This is a request for consideration of a technical and operations
question. Although it pertains to a political topic, I am only asking for
consideration of a matter that is clearly relevant to nanog.

  I vehemently agree. There are other lists for politics.

In particular, what are the 'serious operational impacts' that could
develop? There is a long-standing claim that services of the type offered
by NSI are fine left without special handling (oversight, assistance). To
the extent that problems to such a company can have far-reaching impact on
Internet operations, it would be extremely helpful to understand them
before the fact. This might permit consideration of methods to avoid such
fall-out.

  Well, let's take the most extreme case, where NetSol suddenly
  ceases performing the services of the InterNIC. In such an
  instance, we would hope that the root servers would continue
  to function as they are, without any changes being made until
  a new "A" server comes into being and is accepted by the root
  server operators.

  This is probably what Jon Postel's fear-inspiring experiment
  a few months back was intended to test.

  But, would it really go that smoothly? How long can the root
  servers last without an A?

---------========== J.D. Falk <jdfalk@cybernothing.org> =========---------
  > "How come two middle-aged hippies in L.A. can completely |
  > determine the fate of the global networking infrastructure? |
  > Because we've got the bomb." -- Todd Graham Lewis |
----========== http://www.cybernothing.org/jdfalk/home.html ==========----

This is probably what Jon Postel's fear-inspiring experiment
a few months back was intended to test.

Yes... and he was killed by the wet team from the black helicopter
squadron.

NetSol varies their "services" without regard to their "clients",
that being us.

As their client, I have sent a request for a list of all domains
served by my server (or one of them). When they fail to respond,
I will see them in court. After all, I am paying for a service,
and that service is now being curtailed/withdrawn with no contract
changes, no refund, etc.

Ehud
ObSquatter: If they prepay, it's not squatting, it's legitimate.
ObRandy: whinewhinewhinewhinewhinewhinenothingconstructivewhinewhinewhine

In particular, what are the 'serious operational impacts' that could
develop? There is a long-standing claim that services of the type offered
by NSI are fine left without special handling (oversight, assistance). To
the extent that problems to such a company can have far-reaching impact on
Internet operations, it would be extremely helpful to understand them
before the fact. This might permit consideration of methods to avoid such
fall-out.

Well, let's take the most extreme case, where NetSol suddenly
ceases performing the services of the InterNIC. In such an
instance, we would hope that the root servers would continue
to function as they are, without any changes being made until
a new "A" server comes into being and is accepted by the root
server operators.

This is probably what Jon Postel's fear-inspiring experiment
a few months back was intended to test.

Check your calendar, it was over 12 months ago.

But, would it really go that smoothly? How long can the root
servers last without an A?

About half the Internet would keep on chugging along, on local copies of
the root.zone. This could continue indefinitely. The other half would
shortly follow. It would not take long for a new root.zone repository to
appear. Maybe even a new TLD registry.

While not a network operator, I think it would be most prudent to consider
and discuss (among those who ARE netops) what do to if, say, the root
server were suddenly comletely unaccessible for several days/permanently
for *whatever* reason.

Does anyone know if NSI even has an off-site mirror running? Or are all
the eggs in one basket?

What's going to happen to the ISPs if suddenly everyone of their client's
domains are toast?

Better to have a plan and not need it than need it and not have it. It's
called 'contingency planning'. And a very good idea no matter the endeavor.

"Small minds can only contemplate small ideas".....Unknown

Dean Robb
Owner, PC-EASY
(757) 495-EASY [3279]
On-site computer repair, upgrades and consultations
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