Network Routing without Cisco or Juniper?

In article <cistron.20020904074946.GA84187@dataloss.nl>,

[snip]

Boxes like Foundry, Extreme, Redback and many others all talk BGP
(at least to a first approximation) but is their lack of use in
the core/edge/CPE a lack of scale, stability, performance or just
interest?

One Dutch ISP that shall remain unnamed (and is not one I work for or
have worked for) deployed Extreme on AMS-IX, with Extreme's BGP
implementation.

It broke horribly. The Extreme BGP implementation, instead of sending
their peers just their own prefixes, would send each peer *all*
prefixes and then withdraw all but their own networks. However, doing
this with tens of peers at the same time was too much for the Extreme
itself, which died.

OTOH, I know of other ISPs also present on the AMS-IX that have
been using Extreme switches to connect to the AMS-IX and their
upstreams without any of those problems. Their network has been
very stable for over a year now, I think. It's even a fault-tolerant
setup with VRRP.

Cistron IP is using a Foundry switch right now as core router.
You can't get a BGP/OSPF router with lots of GigE and 10/100
interfaces for that price over at C or J ..

We had some problems with instability at first, but with recent
firmware everything runs just fine.

We have several full BGP upstreams and over a hundred of AMS-IX
peers (at GigE) and it works fine.

On of the nicest things is that the box boots in 15 seconds or
so and even with >100 BGP sessions coming up simultaneously
it's still fast - a Cisco would take minutes to get all BGP
sessions up, the Foundry does it in mere seconds.

Mike.