need opinions re: contact methods for a noc@ alias

Hi there

Over the years I've seen a few very odd methods for dealing with a noc@
email address. I've always had the mindset that:

1) individual users are subscribed to a list/alias for noc@
2) it's _never_ a single/shared "account"
3) it _always_ accepts plaintext email, at the least, for reporting
problems.

recently I've been seing more of the "single account" that some poor sod
on shift uses, and now I've seen it all - an isp who won't accept
plaintext email to their noc@ list, but instead want the person sending
the report to go to a webform and fill it in.

I was wondering what others' thoughts on these and other methods of
dealing with noc@ were.

Regards

--Rob

Hi there

Over the years I've seen a few very odd methods for dealing with a noc@
email address. I've always had the mindset that:

1) individual users are subscribed to a list/alias for noc@
2) it's _never_ a single/shared "account"
3) it _always_ accepts plaintext email, at the least, for reporting
problems.

recently I've been seing more of the "single account" that some poor sod
on shift uses, and now I've seen it all - an isp who won't accept
plaintext email to their noc@ list, but instead want the person sending
the report to go to a webform and fill it in.

All mail should go to an integrated ticketing system. Any of the well-known
addresses should simply open a new ticket. Whatever way the tickets are
handled internally, be that a plaintext email, shared mailbox, single
mailbox, web-form, fax-to-someone-who-replies-by-commenting-on-margins,
should never affect how one can report a problem or contact a company.

Alex