More on the DDoS Attack

To those providers who have started filtering some if not all of the spoofed traffic, and those have been nuking the zombied hosts.

Please accept my thanks, it seems that enough has been stopped so the DNS and websites are now available again.

Thanks,

Matthew

To those providers who have started filtering some if not all of the
spoofed traffic, and those have been nuking the zombied hosts.

Please accept my thanks, it seems that enough has been stopped so the
DNS and websites are now available again.

In case you're curious as to how most of the Universities are handling things,
this is a pretty good article:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A25845-2003Sep4?language=printer

On our campus, we've had about 11,000 systems arrive in our dorms over
the past 10 days. When a computer plugs in, its vlan'ed into a private
network and the user is taken through a system registration process
(we use some spoofed DNS and webserver tricks to get them started). During
the registration process, we scan each computer. If we catch something,
we force them to run a list of patching/cleaning tools before we allow the
system to be registered. By Wednesday at 5pm, we'd stopped 3,400 computers
and forced them to patch/clean. So far, we've found only about 400 or so
systems that squeeked by still infected with Blaster or Sobig.F, but we've
been able to contact their owners and clean all but 68 of them; these 68 are
now shut off the network.

I'm sure my team (the network guys) or our securty team would be more
than happy to share what we've done with anyone interested, I'd imagine
that it would work very well in a cable-modem/DSL environment. Drop me a
note off-list.

Thanks for letting me chew up your time and bandwidth...

Eric :slight_smile:

Where you able to obtain redistribution licenses from the vendors, such as
Microsoft, to distribute the patches to your students? Or did your
restricted VLAN allow them enough access to the Internet to download the
tools directly from the vendor's web sites?

Sean Donelan wrote:

Where you able to obtain redistribution licenses from the vendors, such as
Microsoft, to distribute the patches to your students? Or did your
restricted VLAN allow them enough access to the Internet to download the
tools directly from the vendor's web sites?

Sean, I'm not exactly positive regarding the redistribution. The
vendors in question are really just Microsoft for the patches and
then the cleaning/scanning tools we use. The topic came up in a few
of our group meetings where we prepared for the semester and I _BELIEVE_
the answer was that we have site liscences for the scanning/cleaning
tools we use, with the exception of any freeware/shareware which doesn't
need a liscence, but don't quote me on this. As far as the Microsoft patches,
I'm not sure what the legaleze answer was or the exact distribution method,
though it was on-line (i.e. "click here to download") and not by handing out
burned CDs. So, it was either a local patch repository or a web proxy.

I've received a bunch of off-list requests for information, more than I
was expecting :slight_smile: So, instead of just a quick few-line response I'll try
to write up something a bit more authoratative. Unfortunately, I only
know the details of the network piece, so I have to check with our
security and help desk people to answer in detail some of the other
questions that have come up (i.e. "legally" redistributing patches,
how exactly did the patching work, what scanners did you use/test for, etc).
Our security and support teams are just coming down from two weeks of
craziness, so some of them are off-line this weekend but I'll try to have
something by Monday...

Eric :slight_smile: