Incompetance abounds at the InterNIC

John Fraizer wrote:

Just what does our $35/yr per domain go towards? I would venture to guess
that drive space costs a whole shit load less that all the damned InterNIC
commercials I've been seeing on T.V.!

What $35? Domains are FREE! ... at least for 30 days.

Does anyone know just who we need to bitch very loudly to?

The domain speculators who flood InterNIC with massive numbers of domains
they don't intend to pay for, and then flood again with repeated templates
to re-register the same domain all over again hoping to catch it right
when it gets deleted for non-payment (under a new ficticious name, of
course).

Phil Howard wrote:

John Fraizer wrote:

> Just what does our $35/yr per domain go towards? I would venture to guess
> that drive space costs a whole shit load less that all the damned InterNIC
> commercials I've been seeing on T.V.!

What $35? Domains are FREE! ... at least for 30 days.

> Does anyone know just who we need to bitch very loudly to?

The domain speculators who flood InterNIC with massive numbers of domains
they don't intend to pay for, and then flood again with repeated templates
to re-register the same domain all over again hoping to catch it right
when it gets deleted for non-payment (under a new ficticious name, of
course).

And most of the domains never have working name servers at all. The
internic rules say you're supposed to have name service first. This
isn't always practical, but if speculative domains don't have DNS within
a few days, I'd think that'd be enough to wipe the allocations.

Actually, at this point I'd be happy to supply a credit card or a funded
InterNIC account number along with applications. Money up front may well
be the only way to clobber speculators.

Hammer. Nail. Head. >BANG<

Attack the root of the problem: people have made a market of domain
speculation. Raise the stakes for them, and you'll find that they'll be
more inclined to make a living some other way. The current model costs
them absolutely -nothing-, a zero-cost marketplace for speculators.

I have -no- problem with a "payment up front" requirement. I'd hope that
anyone serious about doing real domain management would be willing to pay
in advance.

My only problem with Pay Up Front is that some customers are going
to be dead beat about paying us. I would want to make sure that
there was some recourse to collecting our money or having the
domain placed on hold until fees are paid. The only way that
I can see doing that now is to register the domain under our name
and then transfer it later once we get paid. Way to much work.

Another way is to take the abusers to court and nail them. Make the
penalty to high and they will leave.

just my $.002 worth at 3am in the morning with US West blowing up
Cascade switches

Actually, at this point I'd be happy to supply a credit card or a funded
InterNIC account number along with applications. Money up front may well
be the only way to clobber speculators.

Hammer. Nail. Head. >BANG<

Attack the root of the problem: people have made a market of domain
speculation. Raise the stakes for them, and you'll find that they'll be
more inclined to make a living some other way. The current model costs
them absolutely -nothing-, a zero-cost marketplace for speculators.

I have -no- problem with a "payment up front" requirement. I'd hope that
anyone serious about doing real domain management would be willing to pay
in advance.

--
Edward S. Marshall <emarshal@logic.net> [ What goes up, must come

down. ]

http://www.logic.net/~emarshal/ [ Ask any system

administrator. ]

My take would be register them as the billing contact and remain as the
adminstrative contacts - the NIC should then have a page set up that the
custoemr can go with a confirmation number to add their credit card info
directly - they could afford them a 3 day window to do so - or the domain
would be deleted. They could also tag a domain that has been reregistered
a 2nd time and demand payment up front before it is registered this time -
that gives the customer 1 bite at convenience - and then hve to put up in
order to ever actually get that particular domain.

Yeah, this spawned a whole long thread (on going ... still) on domain
policy. As long as you can get free domains, at least temporarily, this
will continue to be problem. FWIW, InterNIC has changed whois output and
dropped two key fields, "initial creation date" and "current status". That
got a lot of gripes too. The real solution is one they don't want to do for
some unfathomable reason, pre-payment or online payment for domain names.