Impacts of Encryption Everywhere (any solution?)

In article <CAEmG1=oiVJ4qj_D9hA3WS=g64zoo4pYkZ-zDZ0nEEQcTjE5A=A@mail.gmail.com>,

I am sure these third world nations have more important things to spend
their money on rather than data plans and data devices. Things like food
and medicine come to mind...

In none of the Starving Children in Africa commercials have I ever seen
anyone with a smart phone...

It appears Nairobi proper has decent cell coverage, but the outskirt
villages and such don't appear all that well covered. I am guessing these
are the poorer areas.

To check out the 3 cellular providers coverage maps in Kenya, check out the
maps located here:

https://opensignal.com/networks

-Mike

Math. ^_^;

1GB of volume over the course of a month is 3kb/sec sustained
throughput over the month. (1000000000*8/(86400*30))

$5 per 3kbit/sec means that 155mbit link would cost...$251,100/month.
(155000000/((1000000000*8)/(86400*30))*5)

We call that "Time Domain Multiplexing-based profits".

Comparing volumetric pricing with rate-based pricing
is one of the best ways of tucking in *lots* of room for
profit. :slight_smile:

Matt

4G coverage is not country-wide.

A lot of folk still earn less than US$1/day.

Nairobi isn't Kenya...

Mark.

Actual bandwidth isn't bad at all - so that 1GB can go rapidly.

Practically, networks and customers all find ways to get that 1GB (or
50MB) to take them as far as it impossibly can.

Mark.

I am sure these third world nations have more important things to spend
their money on rather than data plans and data devices. Things like food
and medicine come to mind...

My goodness, aren't we condescending. Since we're talking about Kenya here, a few milliseconds of research reminds us that it's a significant agricultural exporter. Agricultural development there is generally about better use of existing land.

You might also want to learn about M-Pesa, the mobile phone payment system that everybody uses. Stores all have a sign with their M-Pesa number so you can pay them, and there are kiosks all over Nairobi that will exchange M-Pesa credit and cash. The 1GB data bundles I mentioned are large ones. You can get 7MB for a day or 5MB for a week for 5c, which is plenty to check your messages or look up farm prices.

People in Africa may be poorer than we are, but they are just as smart as we are, and they are just as able and interested in technology when it is useful to them.

R's,
John

It's pretty difficult to articulate this sort of thing unless someone
has actually traveled to and experienced a destination, and its peoples,
on their own.

Having had the opportunity to travel the world over the past 2 or more
decades, I've been eagerly disillusioned by what I thought a lot of
countries were either capable of, or not capable of. What I learned...
you can't armchair reality.

The Internet in Indonesia is the very same Internet in Eritrea, as it is
in Canada. We can't quite split that...

Mark.

The Internet in Indonesia is the very same Internet in Eritrea, as it is
in Canada. We can't quite split that…

I admit that I haven’t been to Eritrea or Indonesia, but using Ethiopia
and Malaysia as stand-ins (which I have been to), I can say that while they
are the same internet, the level of development, the payment systems which
are usable via said internet, and other aspects of the daily use and capabilities
which can be utilized on the internet in those countries does vary greatly.

For example, Apple Pay is somewhat ubiquitous in Canada. It’s virtually unheard
of in Ethiopia. My travels to Malaysia were not recent enough for me to comment
accurately on the current state of things.

M-Pesa is widely accepted in Kenya, but not at all in the US or Canada.

PayPal is popular in the US, but not so much in most of the rest of the world.

YMMV.

IPv6 is readily available on almost every mobile phone in the US. Less so in
Kenya or Tanzania, Eritrea, Canada, or Indonesia.

While all connected networks are part of the same big I Internet, not all networks
are created or maintained equal and not all services on those networks are
ubiquitously available to all users of the big I Internet.

Owen

Ethiopia is significantly different and unique, in its own unusual way,
because of the government monopoly telecom. Other people can correct me if
I'm wrong, but unless the situation has changed in the past two years, all
small to medium sized ISPs in Ethiopia are mandated by law to be downstream
of the government run telecom ASN. Also the government owned national
telecom has a monopoly on all international fiber connections to
neighboring countries (at OSI layer 1), and for things like STM/SDH or
1/10/ Gbps Ethernet L2 transport services to any location outside of
Ethiopia.

The Ethiopian Internet is also subject to significant censorship and
attempted blockage of VPN and VoIP services.

https://www.google.com/search?q=ethiopia+internet+censorship&oq=ethiopia+internet+censorship&aqs=chrome.0.0j69i57.2857j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

It was a convenient example with which I had experience near Eritrea.

My statement would apply equally for say, Zambia or Morocco.

Owen

Ethiopia is significantly different and unique, in its own unusual
way, because of the government monopoly telecom.

sadly, these are far from unique; not only in africa, but asia,
oceania, even alyc, ...

randy

Morocco... Sure? Data points?

mh

Everyone in Haiti had a cell phone. Everyone. Even the poorest of the poor. They skipped the enormous expense of copper infrastructure.

The world is very different in person.

And these pockets of extreme isolation sound like a prime opportunity for a WISP or other disruption.

-Ben

Everyone in Haiti had a cell phone. Everyone. Even the poorest of the poor. They skipped the enormous expense of copper infrastructure.

The world is very different in person.

And these pockets of extreme isolation sound like a prime opportunity for a WISP or other disruption.

In some cases, this is a viable solution. In others, not so much.

There are places, for example, where one has to be concerned that your infrastructure will be creatively “recycled” by the locals when you aren’t looking.

Also, deploying a WISP still requires the ability to bring Power to all and Wired Connectivity to some of your deployments.

As I mentioned earlier, Haiti is a relatively easy Wireless deployment topography. Try doing the same thing in the Nevada desert, where the iron rich base minerals combined with the alkali top soil creates a kind of RF sink-hole that causes walkie-talkies that go 3-5 miles anywhere else to fail in as little as 1/4 mile and that’s in the flat areas. Add in the mountains and you’ve got a real interesting deployment where you might need 4 or 5 base stations just to reach 1-2 customers.

There are solutions that can work just about everywhere, but there’s no one solution that works everywhere.

Owen

"And these pockets of extreme isolation sound like a prime opportunity for a WISP or other disruption. "

Which is what the OP of the thread I was looking at was doing, starting a WISP. They could get a 100 - 200 megabit/s per AP access network, but their link to the outside world is currently limited to one meg. For some reason mountain to mountain links weren't a viable option. I don't know the reason why.

I was looking for ways of him getting the most bang for the buck out of the connection. I've got a couple ideas (Steam Cache, Squid in "bump in the middle" configuration, and a squid - squid tunnel with the low speed link in the middle).

My point is the protocol is the same regardless of where in the world
you are; and the global nature of the Internet levels the playing field.
Who extracts the most out of it is a completely separate discussion.

What I am saying is there are different ways many countries do things.
Deciding on how computer communicate isn't one of them.

Mark.

Doesn't at all sound that different from China, North Korea, Saudi
Arabia, Iran or Myanmar... and in the case of international connectivity
openness, Swaziland...

Mark.