DNS Subdomains

Helo,

Might be a simple question.... But... I've got no idea what the answer
could be...

In the early days, one only had a .com address space (amongst the most
popular ones). These days, there is .com(this) and .com(that) and any
kind of .(whatever) you can think of.

My question...

How does one start a .(whatever) ?? Who is actually controlling these
.(whatever) domains ?

well current practice seems to be to declare yourself the legitimate root
authority and go out and set them up

however for the rest of us who either like the internet to continue to function
in a predictable manner or are mere mortals not worthy of declaring ourselves
root the answer is you cant setup new TLDs, that is done by the internet naming
authority - icann

Steve

Gawie Marais (Home) wrote:

Might be a simple question.... But... I've got no idea what the answer
could be...

In the early days, one only had a .com address space (amongst the most
popular ones). These days, there is .com(this) and .com(that) and any
kind of .(whatever) you can think of.

My question...

How does one start a .(whatever) ?? Who is actually controlling these
.(whatever) domains ?

Anybody can put a DNS server on the internet that serves a top-level domain.

The hard part is getting the rest of the world to recognize the existance of your new TLD, and getting them to recognize your server (or pool of servers) as the official server for that TLD.

The official way to get this recognition is to get ICANN (http://www.icann.org/) to recognize you. If you are a government, and you want ICANN to recognize your server as serving the TLD corresponding to your ISO country code, I don't think it's too big a deal, although there may be a lot of red tape to cut through.

If you want to register some other TLD, however, it's almost impossible. Note how long and drawn out (and politically charged) the process was in getting the most recent top-level domains (.aero, .biz, .coop, .info, .museum, .name and .pro) created. There are many more proposed TLDs that have either been rejected or have been tied up in committees.

It is possible to bypass ICANN, but that approach isn't any better.

One way is to get listed with an alternate root server, but you will only be recognized by those service providers that choose to use that alternate root. This is not the entire internet. I don't even think it's a significant portion of it (although I might be wrong here.)

If you don't get listed with an alternate root, then your only choice is to get service providers to manually configure their DNS servers to point to you for resolving your TLD. IMO, you've got no chance of getting even one major service provider to do this for you.

In short, if you want to create a new top-level domain, don't bother. Even if it's possible, I don't think it's worth the effort.

-- David