DC power versus AC power

Unnamed Administration sources reported that Scott Granados said:

Is 48V DC at the amps present normallyin switch rooms etc enough to cause
electricucian? I have seen bad things with wrenches dropped across
batteries even 12 volt car batteries although in this case it was a large
battery bank in a submarine but I was curious about the 48V sources in
switch rooms.

Electrocution is but one way to die from too many columbs.
Internal burning is a big one. Most people die, not from immediate
cardiac arrest, but rather from kidney/spleen/liver failure as
they try to remove the cooked you parts from your bloodstream,
and clog up. (First responder treatment is multiple saline inputs
to flush you out, and keep flushing you. This via a friend who was
"lit" and lived.)

The instantaneous short circuit current available from a CO-grade
battery string is nothing short of frightening. It will easily
turn a 18" crescent wrench bright orange and start spitting the
molten metal around within few seconds.

I'm surprised you're still around after a sub battery accident.
They're a grade up from most CO's in available current, I'd bet.

While I would normally think some of this exaggeration. When I was at Netrail, I did a road trip to upgrade a facility in DC. It's kinda amazing what passed for colo in those days. The little UPS actually had a string of Pet boys car batteries. Nathan Estes dropped a wrench into the battery bay and there was a nice explosion according to him. The wrench literally vaporized. Now I said that wasnt possible. He will stick to his story to this day.

The only thing I could figure was that it literally moltified into super small droplets and just sprayed. Regardless of whether it's completely accurate, he was out searching for another wrench... it took a lot of chocolate mile to relax him after that.

Unnamed Administration sources reported that Scott Granados said:
>
> Is 48V DC at the amps present normallyin switch rooms etc enough to

cause

> electricucian? I have seen bad things with wrenches dropped across
> batteries even 12 volt car batteries although in this case it was a

large

> battery bank in a submarine but I was curious about the 48V sources in
> switch rooms.

Electrocution is but one way to die from too many columbs.
Internal burning is a big one. Most people die, not from immediate
cardiac arrest, but rather from kidney/spleen/liver failure as
they try to remove the cooked you parts from your bloodstream,
and clog up. (First responder treatment is multiple saline inputs
to flush you out, and keep flushing you. This via a friend who was
"lit" and lived.)

The only way I've seen anyone die from being shocked is heart failure. This
was a very very large AC hit though not DC.

The instantaneous short circuit current available from a CO-grade
battery string is nothing short of frightening. It will easily
turn a 18" crescent wrench bright orange and start spitting the
molten metal around within few seconds.

I'm surprised you're still around after a sub battery accident.
They're a grade up from most CO's in available current, I'd bet.

Yes, they are I don't recall the amps off hand but it was amazing. It does
take a lot of juice though to spin motors that large and run all that
equipment considering your primary power source is nuclear also.

In my case I wasn't the one who was hit I was a fair distance off and
someone working, an electrician, touched a wrench across the terminals on
one cell only. For get a few seconds pretty instantly the wrench was gone
as well as a better part of his hand and wrist. However, touching both
terminals on the cell did not yield a shock which was what made me think and
ask the question i the first place. I can't imagine the damage possible
though if someone in that setting touched one of the main bus's.

Yes it will the wrench will become litterally liquid and spray. So no it
doesn't explode in the litteral sense but it appears to and also sounds like
it:). A safe experiment to do which many people probably did as Kids is to
take a piece of tin foil and place it across the terminals of say a trainset
transformer or perhaps a 6 V drycell battery that you set up with a proper
switch so you can switch on the flow when you are standing back. The foil
will sizzle and pop used to be the way you could demonstrate how fuses
worked. Imagine that but this time the wrench handle goes pop.