akamai yesterday - what in the world was that

There is probably a "law" enshrined somewhere: Bandwidth is like closet space, demand will always manage to exceed capacity.

Gene

I remember when a "gateway" was a Microvax II with an ethernet card and a
bisync card, and fuzzballs were the big thing, and the other end of your
connection was either Arpanet or Milnet, and RFCs specified octects for a
reason....

Point of History:

When we, The World, first began allowing the general public onto the
internet in October 1989 we actually had a (mildly shared*) T1
(1.544mbps) UUNET link. So not so bad for the time. Dial-up customers
shared a handful of 2400bps modems, we still have them.

* It was also fanned out of our office to a handful of Boston-area
customers who had 56kbps or 9600bps leased lines, not many.

I started what became 6x7 with a 64k ISDN line. And 9600 baud modems…

in ’93 or so. (I was a child, in Jr High…)

-Ben.

When we, The World, first began allowing the general public onto
the internet in October 1989 we actually had a (mildly shared*) T1
(1.544mbps) UUNET link. So not so bad for the time. Dial-up
customers shared a handful of 2400bps modems, we still have them.

The World was also our (UUNET) Boston hub. And at that time,
cross-country core backbone links were T1. We all thought the NSF T3
backbone was a government boon-doggle. :slight_smile:

Those links were nailed up in the common closet not on 66 blocks but
basically boards with bolts and quarter-sized thumb nuts, that was New
England Telephone's (NET) demarc not our idea, it worked.

One day working with a phone guy I jokingly remarked that's some old
looking stuff, did Alexander Graham Bell put it in?

He looked at me and said "possibly, Bell founded New England Telephone
and would've helped on a job like this". The building was 1898.

I remember the day when the microvax II and all the other vaxes on campus were upgraded from CMU-TEK to the Multinet TCP/IP stack. Gone were the days of maxing out at 14kbit/s on the high speed 10 megabit co-ax campus backbone - we could now get hundreds of kilobits per second. The joy of it.

That decision to upgrade happened the day that all CMU-TEK installations in the world went offline due to some bug or other.

Nick

So, I grew up in South Africa, and one of the more fascinating /
cooler things I saw was a modem which would get you ~50bps (bps, not
Kbps) over a single strand of barbed wire -- you'd hammer a largish
nail into the ground, and clip one alligator[0] clip onto that, and
another alligator clip onto the barbed wire. Repeat the process on the
other side (up to ~5km away), plug the modems in, and bits would
flow... I only saw these used a few times, but always thought they
were cool….

Do you remember anything about the actual type of modem? Or where you deployed them?

In the days before the Internet came to SA, I ran a dial-up email link between the US and Pretoria, polled by various people locally (including CSIR, SAIMR). I also carried mail for the UNHCR in Northern Mozambique. Mail came via Karl Deninger (DDSW1) in Chicago, IIRC.

They were missing several kilometres of phone wire, so connected the link to the fence on each side of the road. We get about 1200bps on a good day IIRC, and would loose carrier whenever someone moved cattle from one field to another and opened a gate in the fence.

  paul

Decades ago, I cobbled together a 20mA current loop interface that may have been an early version of this .. ran a set of Baudot machines (pre-ASCII, upper case & figs only) mostly just to have fun with a set of old ASR 32 teletypes. I used a couple of 500’ spools of zip cord lying on the ground from end to end. Never mind backhoes - it was lawn-mower vulnerable. (However, being flat on the ground seemingly made it less vulnerable to lightning strikes.)

Of course, this was hardly critical infrastructure!

Blessings..

Allen

The Civil Engineering version of this is SWER electrical distribution. Single-Wire, Earth-Return. And it’s as crazy in implementation as it sounds now.

“Call of Duty: Modern Warfare fragged our business VOIP: US ISP blames outage on smash-hit video game rush
This is Windstream, going dark…”
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2020/01/23/windstream_fvoip_outage/

Apparently not everyone came out unscathed.

Shouldn’t game patches like this be released overnight during off-peak hours? Fortnite releases their updates around 3 or 4am when most ISP’s networks are at their lowest utilization. It seems somewhat reckless to release such a large patch during awake hours.

Off-peak hours are on-peak somewhere else in the world.

Shouldn’t game patches like this be released overnight during off-peak hours? Fortnite releases their updates around 3 or 4am when most ISP’s networks are at their lowest utilization. It seems somewhat reckless to release such a large patch during awake hours.

I can’t speak for PS4 and PC, but xbox does have a setting to keep the console in a state that allows the device to download updates when it is ‘off’ but I’ve noticed that the consoles don’t always follow that rule and the update starts downloading when the user powers on the console, which is usually during peak hours. If this worked properly, it would be great since most of the updates would download while users were at school, working, sleeping, etc.

That’s what she said

Not everybody leaves their console/PC on 24/7 so that they would pull the patch at 3am local even if that’s when it was released.

It’s far from reckless. It’s not the game companies job to make sure the network works. That’s our job.

IIRC, game consoles are always on, whether they’re “on” or not.

Xbox One has 2 options, always one (equivalent to windows sleep) and will wake up occasionally for updates, and power save (equivalent to hibernate ish) it will not wake up for updates.

Brandon Jackson
Bojack1437@gmail.com
478-387-8687

I love the symmetric ~10 gig speed test to put it into perspective for how far we’ve come….also the 3 ms ping result. Ain’t it great

-Aaron

IIRC that 64k was in fact 56k with 8k for overhead.

I had one, and it would kick in a second channel if you pushed it, for a whopping 112k. Metered, came out to about $500/mo.

Joly