10GE router resource

From: Mark Tinka <mtinka@globaltransit.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2008 19:12:57 +0800
Sender: owner-nanog@merit.edu

> Hi everybody!

Hello.

> Also I'd love to hear recommendatios for "budget" 10GE
> routers. The "budget" router would be used to hook up
> client networks through one 10GE interface and connect
> to different transit providers through two 10GE
> interfaces.

Today, from Cisco, the smallest router you'll get a 10Gbps
Ethernet port on is the Cisco ASR1000 series. Mind you,
though, FCS for this box isn't until about May. Also, this
box is oversubscribed as the current switch fabric is
10Gbps.

From Juniper, the smallest M-series box you'll get the same
port on is the M120 platform.

You could also look at smaller switches from both vendors,
but if you plan on taking full BGP feeds from your upstream
providers, this might be an issue.

Depending on how the box will be used, Foundry is probably the cheapest,
followed by Force10. Since yo will be connecting to two transit
providers, you probably need the full routing table, but if you don't
need full routes, the new Juniper EX8200 looks like an option. It is
limited to about 12K routes in the FIB. It's not shipping at this time
and I don't know when FSR is scheduled.

Note that F10 does not do MPLS and neither F10 or Foundry has the
software stability of either C or J, so you will need to look closely at
exactly the features needed.

Also I'd love to hear recommendatios for "budget" 10GE

>>> routers. The "budget" router would be used to hook up
>>> client networks through one 10GE interface and connect
>>> to different transit providers through two 10GE
>>> interfaces.

If you don't need BGP-ish power, David Newman just published his test of 10GigE switches today in Network World. He was focusing mostly on switching in the enterprise, but he has a variety of other performance metrics and results which may be helpful:

jms

Joel Snyder wrote:

>>> Also I'd love to hear recommendatios for "budget" 10GE
>>> routers. The "budget" router would be used to hook up
>>> client networks through one 10GE interface and connect
>>> to different transit providers through two 10GE
>>> interfaces.

If you don't need BGP-ish power, David Newman just published his test of 10GigE switches today in Network World. He was focusing mostly on switching in the enterprise, but he has a variety of other performance metrics and results which may be helpful:

Network World | From the data center to the edge

The author's specifications eliminated Cisco's 4900M from the competition. That not unexpected though since it was a evaluation of access switches w/ 10G uplinks. The 4900M has 8 on-board 10G interfaces and expansion modules that can carry 8 more (not oversubscribed) or 16 (oversubscribed). It has has GigE support via TwinGig modules in the expansion module bays. It also has a 320Gbps backplane and can handle up to 200k v4 routes. It's an impressive little switch if you need 10G aggregation. It can't handle a full table of course but it still has a lot of use. No MPLS options. It's based on the 4500's Sup 6-E.

The base unit starts at $16k.

Justin